Monday, November 23, 2015

Using Lemongrass to Make Tea

Many of my posts are inspired by my CSA box. I became a subscriber in August of 2012 after moving to my small desert community. In a post I shared on my family's SNAP challenge, I shared that I used to live in a metropolitan area of Southern California where I had the privilege of visiting a farmers market every day of the week (if I wanted to). While I don't have a market every day of the week, I'm happy to report that a farmers' market did open up in September. It's on Sundays. They bring in mostly organic produce. I'm super grateful for Abundant Harvest Organics delivering in-season organic produce from small farmers around the somewhat local region to my town. 

I received lemongrass one Saturday and like the past post on the purple potatoes, I had only seen it on the Food Network's "Chopped." From this brief encounter, I knew it was good in Asian cuisine but I am not too familiar with dishes to make using the ingredient. I have even used natural products (lip balms and body creams) with lemongrass as one of the ingredients. As a side note, one of my friends sells products from this business; the ingredients are 97-100% natural.  

With the lemongrass from my CSA box, I made tea. 



Though the raw honey is pictured, I didn't end up needing it. I boiled 5 cups of spring water then steeped 4 stalks of lemongrass and 3 quarter inch pieces of ginger for 10 minutes. In order to infuse the lemongrass into the boiling water, I gently smashed the stalks with a meat tenderizer until they opened up slightly. 

Can you imagine how my kitchen smelled? Lovely!! After steeping the lemongrass and ginger, I removed the ginger and left the stalks in the water and let it cool before adding it to my glass container. I had some of the tea last night and it was delicious and didn't need the honey for a sweetener. If you decide to use raw honey for a sweetener, you'd be able to get away with 1-2 teaspoons. 

Ingredients:
4 stalks of lemongrass, gently tenderized (I used this tenderizer)
3 quarter inch pieces of ginger
5 cups of spring water (I use this for filtering) 
1-2 tsp of raw honey (optional) 
The raw honey pictured is from a beekeeper in Temecula, CA but I linked to a good choice on Amazon. I prefer unfiltered raw honey for its superb healing and protective benefits. If you're located in or near the Indian Wells Valley, CA, you can message me and I will give you the contact information for the gal who hosts the co-op for Cox Honey. 

Ginger is an antioxidant; it is said to reduce symptoms of motion sickness and nausea. More benefits can be found here (whfoods).

Lemongrass is said to aid in digestion as well as calming nervousness per Mother Earth News (source).

I have another large piece of lemongrass waiting to be smashed, steeped, and marinated to be had in a nice cup of tea! Will you try my recipe?




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Choose, eat, and live well! =)

Monday, November 9, 2015

A Season for Change, The Time Is Now {Guest Post}

iConveyAwareness | A Season for Change, The Time is Now - Guest Post - Rebecca Champlin

"Life is happening now. Real life can be crazy, messy with peaks, valleys; and it can be overwhelming to start something new. Sometimes we have to step back and ask, “What am I being called to right now?” The answer may be to start a project or may just be adding one new good habit, like taking a walk around the neighborhood or drinking more water during the day. Either is a good decision. These short-term, positive decisions will lead to long-term success, but it starts now. Be purposeful and plant something that will be fruitful in 20 years.

Starting a new project, implementing a change can be hard; some don’t know how to do it. There are many resources out there. For example: People who are willing to help and encourage your journey. Reach out. I submit to you four actions: Prepare, Plant, Water, and Be Patient.